Morar Olimpíadas shot between 2014 and 2016 shows the rapid urban transformation of Rio de Janeiro as 
the city prepared to host the 2016 Summer Olympics. The cost of hosting a games has risen 200,000% since the first in 1896. The official estimate for Rio 2016 is $12 billion including infrastructure projects, though some reports state it could be nearer $20 billion in the end. These construction processes typically transpire behind tall walls, blockades, and barriers. As such, they are difficult, if not impossible, to appreciate, let alone access from ground level. These vertical aerial images, which often take on a graphic, abstract appearance, offer not only a new perspective of the scale of construction and development in Rio, but also simultaneously highlight the social inequality that the Games brings. From new transport infrastructure linking wealthy neighborhood’s which locals cant afford to use, to bulldozing of favelas and new apartments for the rich in the post Olympic village. The negative environmental impact of the promised cleaning up of polluted waters and a Golf course built in an environmentally protected zone for the benefit of corrupt property developers and officials. To the deaths of eleven construction workers caused through rushed building schedules and poor planning. And of course the long term little or unused venues. Morar Olimpíadas shows how the Olympic monolith imprints itself on to a host city and raises the question: for whom does Olympic development benefit?

Morar Olimpíadas
The Maracanã Stadium, host to the 2016 opening and closing ceremonies, was refitted with a new roof and seating for the 2014 World Cup. Ticket prices for regular league games have since soared. Zona Norte, 2014
Irrigation work taking place on the site of the Olympic Beach Volleyball Arena. Copacabana Beach, 2014
Residents fight eviction as their homes start to be demolished in Vila Autódromo next to the Olympic Park site. Barra da Tijuca, 2014
Construction of the Olympic Village, which consists of 31 tower blocks, houses 17,000 athletes during the games. Barra da Tijuca, 2014
The leveling of the Perimeter highway has been part of the Olympic cultural legacy redevelopment of Rio’s port area. Porto do Rio de Janeiro, 2014
Breaking ground and the beginnings of construction work at the Olympic Park. Barra da Tijuca, 2014
Foundations being laid for the International Broadcast Centre at the Olympic Park. Barra da Tijuca, 2014
Early construction of the three Carioca Arenas, the Rio Olympic Velodrome and Olympic Tennis Arena. Barra da Tijuca, 2014
Houses are demolished to accommodate the BRT Transolímpica, a new rapid bus transit line. Deodoro, 2015
Site clearing to create the Whitewater Stadium for the two canoe slalom courses. Deodoro, 2015
The fully-irrigated Olympic golf course was built on an environmentally sensitive area, during a regional drought. Barra da Tijuca, 2015
Water has to be stored in blue tanks on rooftops in Rocinha, one of Rio’s largest favelas, where water shortages are common. Zona Sul, 2015
The private homes in the affluent neighborhoods around the main Olympic site, have lush gardens and swimming pools. Barra da Tijuca, 2015
The Athletes’ Park, an area for entertainment and relaxation, was the first venue for the games to be completed. Barra da Tijuca, 2015
The construction of the Olympics Aquatic Stadium is a temporary structure and will be dismantled following the games. Barra da Tijuca, 2015
Construction of the Rio Olympic Velodrome and surrounding Olympic Park area. Barra da Tijuca, 2015
The Olympic Tennis Arena and Carioca Arena 3 during the build. Barra da Tijuca, 2015
The main plaza area in the heart of the Olympic Park being cleared. Barra da Tijuca, 2015
The toll station for the BRT Transolímpica in Estrada do Catonho. Zona Oeste, 2016
The completed tunnel on the BRT Transolímpica transport link at Boiuna. Zona Oeste, 2016
The newly-built Terminal Centro Olímpico transport hub. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
The three Carioca Arenas with support out-buildings at the Olympic Park. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
The completed Olympic Tennis Arena has a capacity of over 19,000. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
The International Broadcast Centre has 12 studios and can hold up to 10,000 people. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
The Live Site outdoor entertainment area has been created to accommodate up to 25,000 visitors, who can follow the games on screens. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
Polluted waters close to the Olympic site were supposed to be cleared ahead of the games as part of a wider pledge made during the city’s bid to host the event. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
The Whitewater Stadium holds around 25 million liters of water. Deodoro, 2016
The newly built Olympic Village apartments will be sold as luxury homes after the games. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
New housing has been built for the 20 residents of Vila Autódromo, who refused to move. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
The construction of the luxury Riserva Golf Vista Mare Residenziale complex next to the 18th hole of the Olympic golf course. Barra da Tijuca, 2016
A local football pitch in the Morro da Casa Branca favela might have benefitted from Morar Carioca, an Olympic pledge to improve the infrastructure of the favelas, which fell by the wayside. Centro, 2016

Morar Olimpíadas

Morar Olimpíadas shot between 2014 and 2016 shows the rapid urban transformation of Rio de Janeiro as 
the city prepared to host the 2016 Summer Olympics. The cost of hosting a games has risen 200,000% since the first in 1896. The official estimate for Rio 2016 is $12 billion including infrastructure projects, though some reports state it could be nearer $20 billion in the end. These construction processes typically transpire behind tall walls, blockades, and barriers. As such, they are difficult, if not impossible, to appreciate, let alone access from ground level. These vertical aerial images, which often take on a graphic, abstract appearance, offer not only a new perspective of the scale of construction and development in Rio, but also simultaneously highlight the social inequality that the Games brings. From new transport infrastructure linking wealthy neighborhood’s which locals cant afford to use, to bulldozing of favelas and new apartments for the rich in the post Olympic village. The negative environmental impact of the promised cleaning up of polluted waters and a Golf course built in an environmentally protected zone for the benefit of corrupt property developers and officials. To the deaths of eleven construction workers caused through rushed building schedules and poor planning. And of course the long term little or unused venues. Morar Olimpíadas shows how the Olympic monolith imprints itself on to a host city and raises the question: for whom does Olympic development benefit?

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